Campus Collusion
Review Questions for Test Preparation

       
    

  



Pediatric GI DisordersMaternity & Pediatric Nursing

Review Online for Free
Lies about Study Techniques: Believe them at your own risk.
www.NursingInAFlash.com

Page 7
Skip Navigation Links
Question Answer
Cleft palate is surgically repaired around the age of ________.
Show Answer
9-18 months
What are the prenatal risk factors for the development of cleft lip/palate?
Show Answer
Maternal smoking, prenatal infection, advanced maternal age or use of anticonvulsants, steroids or other medications during early pregnancy
Which two races have the highest incidence of cleft lip/palate? Which has the lowest?
Show Answer
More common in Native Americans and Asians and less common in African Americans.
______ results when the maxillary processes fail to fuse with the elevations on the frontal prominence during the sixth week of gestation
Show Answer
Cleft lip
Normal union of the upper lip is complete by the ______ week of gestation.
Show Answer
7th week
Fusion of the secondary palate occurs between _____ and _______weeks gestation.
Show Answer
5-12th weeks
Congenital defects such as tracheoesophageal fistula, omphalocele, trisomy 13, and skeletal dysplasias are associated with ________.
Show Answer
Cleft lip and palate
How is cleft lip typically diagnosed?
Show Answer
May be seen on ultrasound by 13 to 16 weeks gestation. Always Is apparent at birth
Once a child has had cleft lip/palate surgical repair, what are important interventions during the post-operative period?
Show Answer
Prevent injury to the suture line by prevent the infant from rubbing the site. Position the infant in a supine or side-lying position, may need to restrain them, avoid putting items like suction catheters, spoons, straws, pacifiers, etc. in the mouth Prevent crying
A malformation that results from failure of the esophagus to develop as a continuous tube during the fourth and fifth weeks of gestation...
Show Answer
Esophageal atresia
Download these questions to your phone here
T/F Blood pressure will remain normal in a child with dehydration until it eventually decreases as the dehydration becomes severe.
Show Answer
True
Children with severe dehydration should receive IV fluids, the initial dose is typically ______ mL/kg of normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution.
Show Answer
20 mL
T/F Tap water, mild, undiluted fruit juices, soup and broth are appropriate fluids for oral rehydration.
Show Answer
False. Children should get a solution with sodium chloride and glucose, like Pedialyte, Infalyte or Ricelyte.
What is the underlying pathology of pyloric stenosis?
Show Answer
The circular muscle of the pyloris becomes hypertrophied, creating an outlet obstruction resulting in vomiting.
Children with pyloric stenosis typically present with symptoms of nonbilious vomiting between weeks ____ and ______ of life.
Show Answer
2-4
A _________ is performed by cutting the muscle of the pylorus to relieve gastric outlet obstruction caused by pyloric stenosis.
Show Answer
Pyloromyotomy
What are the signs and symptoms of pyloric stenosis?
Show Answer
Forceful, non-bilious vomiting, hunger soon after vomiting, weight loss, dehydration which progresses to lethargy. Prensence of a hard, moveable olive in the RUQ.
What GI disorder? Presence of a hard, moveable "olive" in the RUQ
Show Answer
Pyloric stenosis
What GI disorder? Localized pain in the RLQ
Show Answer
Appendicitis
What GI disorder? Autoimmune condition triggered by consumption of gluten
Show Answer
Celiac's Disease
What metabolic imbalance can occur from dehydration?
Show Answer
Metabolic alkalosis
  
Page 7 Skip Navigation Links
Not what your looking for, continue searching

    
Skip Navigation Links