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Pediatric GI DisordersMaternity & Pediatric Nursing

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Children with celiac disease also commonly have what other food intolerance?
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Lactose intolerance
What are considered the risk factors for celiac disease?
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Caucasian European descent and a family hx of celiac disease
What is the typical appearance of a child with celiac disease?
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Distended abdomen, wasted buttocks, and very thin extremities
What are the dianostic findings indicative of Celiac disease?
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Partial or subtotal villous astrophy or blunting of the villi of the small intestine identified from a biopsy of the duodenum during an upper endoscopy, presence of IgA and IgG antibodies that disappear when gluten is no longer ingested.
How long prior to a scheduled biopsy to determine a diagnosis of Celiac Disease, should a child not be restricted from eating gluten in order to achieve an accurate diagnosis?
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2 months prior to the test unless they become very ill
What is the priority nursing intervention related to celiac disease?
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Patient/family education regarding foods that have gluten and the importance of adhering to a gluten free diet
What is a celiac crisis?
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An acute episode of vomiting and profuse watery diarrhea precipitated by infection, F&E depletion or emotional disturbances
_______ is the absence of some or all of the major biliary ducts, resulting in obstruction of bile flow.
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Biliary atresia
What happens in a child with biliary atresia (what are the effects)?
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Cholestasis causes progressive fibrosis which results in end-stage cirrhosis of the liver
Biliary atresia presents around ______ of age in term, healthy infants who have resolved physiologic jaundice.
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4 weeks
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How is biliary atresia treated?
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A Kasai procedure, where the bowel lumen is connected to the bile duct remnants at the porta hepatis, is performed.
A Kasai procedure to treat biliary atresia is typically only successful if performed in infants ______ weeks old or less.
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8 weeks
What impact does biliary atresia have on bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, liver enzymes and GGT lab values?
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They will all be elevated
What are complications associated with biliary atresia, aside from liver failure?
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Ascites, portal hypertension and GI bleeds
How is biliary atresia diagnosed?
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A liver biopsy
What are the focuses of nursing management of biliary atresia?
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Vitamin and caloric support, particularly vitamins D,A,K, E
What are the most common symptoms of biliary atresia?
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Persistent or recurring jaundice, acholic stool (chalky, white), enlarged, hardened liver, dark urine, possibly splenomegaly
If jaundice persists in an infant beyond two weeks and direct serum bilirubin is elevated, what condition should be suspected?
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Biliary atresia
How long would a baby with biliary atresia live if left untreated?
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2 years
______ is an inflammation of the liver that can be caused by viral infections, bacterial invasion, metabolic disorders, chemical toxicity or trauma.
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Hepatitis
________ hepatitis impacts mostly adolescent females and is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice, fever, fatigue and right upper quadrant pain.
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Autoimmune
  
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