Campus Collusion
Review Questions for Test Preparation

       
    

  



Visual and Auditory ProblemsMedical-Surgical Nursing

Review Online for Free
Lies about Study Techniques: Believe them at your own risk.
www.NursingInAFlash.com

Page 18
Skip Navigation Links
Question Answer
What would your recommendation be for a African American patient in his 70's with respect to frequency of ophthalmologic examinations?
Show Answer
African Americans are more susceptible to glaucoma and therefore should have their exams more frequently than the standard recommendation of 1-2 years for this age range. He should be seen yearly.
What are acute interventions a nurse can perform for a patient with glaucoma (acute cases are usually for surgical patients or those with acute angle closure glaucoma)?
Show Answer
Administer meds as ordered, darken the room, apply cool compresses to the forehead, and provide a quiet space to increase comfort. After surgery, provide comfort measures and teaching instruction to the client/family.
You have a glaucoma patient that is on a Beta-adrenergic blocker. During your visit, you assess cardiac function and determine the client has bradycardia. Should you be concerned? Why or why not?
Show Answer
Yes, beta blockers are contraindicated for patients with bradycardia, patients who have greater than first degree heart block, overt heart failure or are in cardiogenic shock.
You have a glaucoma patient that is on a cardioselective beta blocker. You notice when reviewing their history that they also have COPD. Should you be concerned, why or why not?
Show Answer
No, a cardiogenic beta blocker (B1) only impacts heart function. A non-selective cardiogenic beta blocker (B1 and B2) would be a cause for concern.
You have an older glaucoma patient who has Rheumatoid Arthritis and is on a high dose aspirin therapy. You know this patient should not be given a prescription for any ___________ drug.
Show Answer
Carbonic anhydrase inhibiting (Acetazolamide, Dichlorphenamide, Methazolamide, Brinzolamide or Dorzolamide)
Uveitis is used to describe inflammation of...
Show Answer
The uveal tract, retina, vitreous body or optic nerve
________ is an opportunistic eye infection that occurs in patients with AIDS or other immunosuppressed patients.
Show Answer
Cytomegalovirus retinitis (CMV retinitis)
Sterile intraocular inflammation is caused by...
Show Answer
Autoimmune disorders like juvenile arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease, AIDs, malignancies and other systemic diseases
What are common symptoms of a sterile intraocular inflammation?
Show Answer
Pain and photosensitivity
__________ is an extensive intraocular inflammation of the vitreous cavity and can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi or parasites.
Show Answer
Endophthalmitis
Download these questions to your phone here
__________ can be a devastating complication of intraocular surgery or a penetrating injury that can lead to blindness within hours or days.
Show Answer
Endophthalmitis
What are the signs and symptoms of endophthalmitis?
Show Answer
Ocular pain, photophobia, decreased visual acuity, headaches, upper lid edema, reddened and swollen conjunctiva and corneal edema
When all layers of the eye (vitreous, retina, choroid, and sclera) are involved in the inflammatory response, the patient has __________.
Show Answer
Panophthalmitis
Intraocular infections require _________ medications, whereas sterile intraocular inflammations are treated with _____________ medications.
Show Answer
Intraocular inflammation = antimicrobial agents Sterile intraocular inflammation = anti-inflammatory agents (like corticosteroids)
Removal of an eye (surgically) is called...
Show Answer
Enucleation
___________ is when a normal eye develops an inflammatory response when the other eye undergoes trauma. In some cases it can only be treated with enucleation of the traumatized eye.
Show Answer
Sympathetic Ophthalmia
How long after enucleation is a wound sufficiently healed enough to be fitted for a prosthesis?
Show Answer
6 weeks
A hematoma that develops after trauma to the external ear needs to be aspirated because...
Show Answer
Inflammation of the ear cartilage (perichondritis) can result.
How can a blow to the ear cause conductive hearing loss?
Show Answer
The ossicles can become damaged or the tympanic membrane can become perforated
Head trauma that injures the ______ lobe of the cerebral cortex can impair the ability to understand the meaning of sounds.
Show Answer
Temporal
_______ involves inflammation or infection of the epithelium of the auricle and ear canal.
Show Answer
External otitis
  
Page 18 Skip Navigation Links
Not what your looking for, continue searching

    
Skip Navigation Links