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You have a client that has just been diagnosed with Adult inclusion Conjunctivitis (AIC). As you are discussing their antibiotic treatment, you know you must also discuss...
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The sexual implications of the condition, people with AIC have a high risk of concurrent chlamydial infections as well as other STDS. You should also include education about the ocular condition.
What is the defining symptom of allergic conjunctivitis?
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Itching (although they can also have burning, redness, tearing, and white or clear exudate).
How is allergic conjunctivitis treated?
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Avoid the allergen, use artificial tears to flush the allergen from the eye, and antihistamines or corticosteroids if extremely bothersome.
If allergic conjunctivitis is chronic, what can happen?
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The exudate (which is normally white or clear) can become mucopurulent.
How is keratitis different from keratoconjunctivitis?
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Keratitis involves only the cornea, keratoconjunctivitis involves the cornea and conjunctiva
________ is an inflammation or infection of the cornea that can be caused by a microorganism or other factors.
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Keratitis
What are risk factors for bacterial keratitis?
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Mechanical or chemical corneal epithelial damage, wearing contact lenses, debilitation (weakness), nutritional deficiency, immunosuppression or use of a contaminated product (like saline, cosmetics, etc.)
How is bacterial keratitis treated?
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Usually with topical antibiotics. Severe cases can require subconjunctival antibiotic injections or IV antibiotics
What is the most common cause of infectious corneal blindness in the Western hemisphere?
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Herpes Simplex virus (HSV). It is most commonly caused by HSV-1, but can be caused by HSV-2.
You are assessing a patient and notice they have a corneal ulceration that is dendritic. When the patient is questioned, he tells you he had conjunctivitis, but now he's experiencing more pain and the light is hurting his eyes. You strongly suspect that he has...
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HSV keratitis (the dendritic corneal ulcer is characteristic)
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How can a patient with HSV keratitis have a better chance at spontaneous healing?
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If the cornea is debrided to remove infected cells, the chance of spontaneous healing increases from 40% to 70%
What is involved in collaborative therapy to treat HSV keratitis?
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Corneal debridement, topical therapy with vidarabine (Vira-A) or trifluridine (Viroptic) for 2-3 weeks. Oral Acyclovir (Zovirax) may also be administered
What organism is responsible for the eye condition HZO?
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HZO stands for Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus. It is caused by Varicella-zoster virus (chickenpox)
Topical ______ are usually contraindicated for treating HSV keratitis because it can deepen corneal ulcerations and cause the disease course to lengthen.
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Corticosteroids
What is HZO?
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It stands for Herpes Zoster Opthalmicus, a form of keratitis caused by an endogenous latent infection (you had chickenpox and now it's come back) or direct/indirect contact with a person infected with chickenpox or herpes zoster.
Who is most likely to suffer from Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus?
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An older adult or a client who is immunosuppressed.
How is Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus treated?
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Analgesics for pain (both opioid/non-opioid), topical corticosteroids, Acyclovir to reduce viral replication, mydriatic agents to dilate the pupil and alleviate pain, and topical antibiotics to combat secondary infection. Warm compresses and povidone-iodine gel can also be applied to affected skin (but not near the eye)
_________ keratoconjunctivitis is the most serious ocular adenoviral disease.
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Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC)
What are the signs and symptoms of Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC)?
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Tearing, redness, photophobia and foreign body sensation, and usually infects only one eye
How is Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) spread?
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In a medical setting it is spread through contaminated hands and medical instruments, it is also spread by direct contact including sexual activity
How is Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) treated?
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Ice packs, dark sunglasses, and in severe cases topical corticosteroids and topical antibiotic ointment
  
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