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Cardiac Monitoring and DysrhythmiasMedical-Surgical Nursing-7th edition

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Question Answer
_______ is a highly antigenic thrombolytic and often causes fever. It can only be used once every 6 months.
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Streptokinase
A decision whether a patient is going to receive fibrinolytic therapy should be made within _______ of admission.
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30 minutes
How long after a person reports chest pain does a hospital have to start an EKG?
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10 minutes
For a patient with a STEMI, how long do you have? EKG_______, TPA decision_______, and Balloon/PCI_______
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EKG - 10 min., TPA - 30 min., and Balloon - 90 min.
What do phases 1,2 and 3 of the action potentials represent?
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Repolarization
How is Torsades de Point treated?
Show Answer
Magnesium
What is PEA and how is it treated?
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Pulseless electrical activity. Look for the cause which can be: cardiac tamponade, hypothermia, hypoxia, etc. Treat cause.
Which method of heart rate measurement via EKG strip is the only way to measure irregular rhythms?
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Counting R intervals and multiplying by 10.
Which dysrhythmias can trigger R on T phenomenon (sustained ventricular tachycardia)?
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Premature Ventricular Contraction (PVC)
What happens when P waves in junction rhythms?
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They are inverted due to retrograde conduction to the atria and can occur before, during or after a QRS depending on when the impulse arrived.
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What is the electrical flow of the heart in junctional rhythms?
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Ventricular conduction is normal, but the atria are depolarized via retrograde conduction.
What does Phase 0 of the action potentials represent?
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Ventricular depolarization.
What is used to determine how therapeutic Heparin is and what reversal agent can be used?
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Protamine
What EKG changes can point to a history of MI?
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Q waves take place of ST elevation; occurs in lead where damage occurred; and only with transmural/ STEMI.
EKG electrodes placed towards the bottom are usually _______ and those placed on top are usually _______.
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Bottom = (+) and Top = (-)
Which leads are considered the precordial (chest) leads and where are their electrolytes placed?
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AVF - augmented left foot; AVL - augmented left arm; AVR - augmented right arm. One electrode placed in the middle of the chest, *6 views.
Which leads are considered the limb leads and where are their electrodes placed?
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Leads I, II, & III. Right arm (wrist), left arm and left leg or lower abdomen. *3 views of the heart.
What is overdrive suppression?
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The pacemaker site with the fastest rate will generally control the heart rate. *Usually SA node.
What is reperfusion dysrhythmia and what is it associated with?
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Fibrinolytic therapy; dysrhythmias that signals the myocardium is reperfusing.
What heart view? Leads II, III and AVF.
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Inferior wall
What EKG changes can occur in a patient with decreased potassium levels?
Show Answer
T wave flattens, U wave appears, as levels decrease, T wave may invert, and triggers ventricular irritability which can lead to fatal dysrhythmias.
  
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