Campus Collusion
Review Questions for Test Preparation

       
    

  



Cardiopulmonary BasicsMedical-Surgical Nursing-7th edition

Review Online for Free
Lies about Study Techniques: Believe them at your own risk.
www.NursingInAFlash.com

Page 3
Skip Navigation Links
Question Answer
What conditions affect chest wall movement?
Show Answer
Pregnancy, obesity, musculoskeletal abnormalities (kyphosis, scoliosis, pectus excavatum), trauma, increased doses of opioids, neuromuscular disease like myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barre, poliomyelitis, CNS alterations, and chronic disease.
_______ can be used as an early index of damage to the myocardium. It increases within 3 hours of the event.
Show Answer
Myoglobin (should be less than 90 mcg/L)
A _______ determines coronary blood flow changes with increased activity.
Show Answer
Thallium (stress test)
...invasive measure of intracardiac electrical pathways. Provides more specific information about difficult to treat dysrhythmias.
Show Answer
Electrophysiological Study (EPS)
...noninvasive measure of heart structure and heart wall motion. Demonstrates overall cardiac performance...
Show Answer
Echocardiography
Abnormal impulses originating above the ventricles are _______ dysrhythmias.
Show Answer
supraventricular (*abnormal P wave)
_______ is a common dysrhythmia in older adults. Irregularly irregular
Show Answer
Atrial fibrillation
Tachydysrhythmias and bradydysrhythmias _______ cardiac output and BP.
Show Answer
lower; tachydysrhythmias lower diastolic filling time and bradydysrhythmias lower heart rate
P wave = _______, PR interval = _______, QRS complex = _______, QT interval = _______
Show Answer
P wave = electrical conduction thru atria; PR interval = AV to bundle of his to Purkinje; QRS complex = impulse thru ventricles; and QT interval = ventricular depolarization and repolarization.
What is the path of conduction through the heart?
Show Answer
SA node (pacemaker) (60-100bpm) to AV node (40-60 bpm) to Bundle of His (20-40 bpm) to Purkinje (20-40 bpm).
Download these questions to your phone here
How does the body adapt to hypovolemia?
Show Answer
Increases the heart rate. Peripheral vasoconstriction to increase the volume of blood returned to the heart, thereby increasing the cardiac output.
...radionuclide angiography. Used to evaluate cardiac structure, myocardial perfusion and contractility.
Show Answer
Scintigraphy
What are signs and symptoms of left-side heart failure?
Show Answer
Fatigue, breathlessness (often at rest), dizziness, confusion, crackles, hypoxia, cough, and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea.
What diseases lead to myocardial pump failure?
Show Answer
Coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, valvular disorders, and pulmonary disease.
Type of cardiomyopathy where the myocardium is non-pliable. The ventricles don't relax enough to allow adequate filling.
Show Answer
Restrictive
What CK findings are diagnostic for an acute myocardial infarction?
Show Answer
A 50% increase between two samples 3-6 hours apart or a single increase two fold.
What could decrease a QT interval?
Show Answer
Digitalis therapy, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia.
What is the formula for Cardiac Output?
Show Answer
CO = SV x HR
With respect to the conduction system of the heart, the ANS, PNS, and SNS control...
Show Answer
ANS = rate of impulsion generation and speed of transmission. PNS = originate from vagus, decreasing rate and innervate atria, ventricles, SA and AV nodes. SNS = higher rate of impulse generation and speed, innervate all parts of atria and ventricles.
Pulmonary disease is a common cause of _______ side heart failure.
Show Answer
Right (result of increased pulmonary vascular resistance)
What are signs and symptoms of angina pectoris?
Show Answer
Aching, sharp, tingling or burning; pressure ; left sided chest pain, can radiate to jaw, neck and back. *Relieved with rest and/or nitroglycerin.
  
Page 3 Skip Navigation Links
Not what your looking for, continue searching

    
Skip Navigation Links